Author: James Kingsland

I'm a freelance science writer formerly on the staff of New Scientist and the Guardian in London. Right now my particular interest is Buddhist psychology and mindfulness research. My book about the science of enlightenment, Siddhartha's Brain, comes out in 2016 (on 26 April in the US and 2 June in the UK)

Mindfulness monthly: irate taxi drivers, craving and paranoia

London taxi
A London taxi. Angry driving is bad driving. Photograph: Ed_g2s/Wikimedia Commons

Driving a stifling taxi cab on clogged city streets for hour after hour – scared half to death by careless pedestrians stepping into the road, harangued by passengers late for their lunch appointments, exasperated by the incompetence of your fellow drivers – would tax the patience of Mahatma Gandhi.

These men and women deserve our sympathy. They need our help to get through their shift without winding down the window and shouting obscenities at the next person who annoys them. Or worse. Quite apart from the danger to other road users, there is also ample evidence that anger can lead to a heart attack and raises the risk of heart disease.

Anger management

Psychologists have investigated the causes and consequences of aggressive, angry driving, but much less attention has been paid to strategies for preventing it. There have been a few attempts to measure how good cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) are at changing the attitudes and responses of angry drivers to certain cues, but now researchers in Iran have conducted the first study to compare the effectiveness of these two approaches. (more…)

Uncanny synchronicity in the brain during near death experiences and meditation

Stone Buddha head enveloped by roots
The Buddha is said to have entered a state of deep meditation as he died

People who have had a near-death experience commonly report a sense of wellbeing and peace, detachment from the world, the feeling of being outside their own body, and seeing a bright light. People who meditate deeply often report very similar sensations. Research reported yesterday in the journal PNAS suggests what may link the two experiences. (more…)

Cigarettes and cupcakes: mindfulness meditation reduces craving

Delicious cupcakes
Resistance is useless: it just makes the craving worse

Life is so unfair. Trying to give up something you’re addicted to just makes you crave that thing even more, whether it’s cigarettes, alcohol or sugar. You’re caught in a Catch-22: you want to quit, but the more you try, the harder it gets to resist temptation. Perhaps the key is not to try so damn hard, but instead improve your brain’s capacity for self-control.

It might just work… (more…)

The Universe in a Single Atom by His Holiness the Dalai Lama – review

Wimbledon Buddhist temple
The Buddhapadipa temple in Wimbledon, UK, which offers meditation classes for beginners

The Dalai Lama wants every cognitive scientist to learn how to meditate. He believes this will give them insights into the mind and consciousness that plastering electrodes on scalps or scanning brains with powerful magnetic fields never could.

Whereas a scientist looks at the mind from the outside, he says, an experienced meditator examines it from within. Neither sees the whole picture and so we could learn a great deal by combining the two perspectives. (more…)

Mindfulness monthly: bipolar disorder, time perception, older people, and eating disorders

A Buddhist monks blesses tourists on a beach in ThailandEvery month I’m going to round up the latest research about the potential applications of mindfulness. I’ll pick out only four or five nuggets (writing in detail about one, and writing a very brief summary of the others) but link to the awesome Mindfulness Research Monthly newsletter, which provides a much more comprehensive review of the field than I could ever do. (more…)

Channel 4’s Child Genius: why the losers are the real winners

Winner of Channel 4 Child Genius 2013 Shrinidi PrakashCongratulations to Shrinidi Prakash, who won the final of the Child Genius 2013 competition run by Mensa and broadcast on Channel 4 last night. She is a worthy winner, excelling at mental arithmetic, reasoning, spelling, memory tasks and (last night) debating. Even more impressively, she is the daughter of Indian immigrant parents whose first language is not English. All the other competitors had English parents. Shrinidi was already an under-12 international scrabble champ. Her extraordinary command of English must surely be down to her love of books (which she enjoys sniffing as well as reading!). (more…)